Photographs
Lady Amherst Fly Volume One of two volumes: 1840—1935.

320 pages, 350 photos, with a detailed map of the river.

Three-quarter leather binding with a slipcase.

Books available on May 1st, 2006. Price: $85.
T he history of the Grand Cascapedia River spans over 150 years. It is replete with interesting men and women, whose interaction with others often exposed the uneven edges of human nature, and whose stories are the stuff of novels. Large fish also have their place in this narrative, as does the politics that goes with any piece of valued turf that is sought after by men of influence, many of who were not Canadians. The provincial government realized after confederation in 1867 that salmon were a potentially valuable resource, a realization that promulgated directives designed to regulate fishing conditions on all provincial rivers. The subsequent regulations, and methods of enforcement, mark stages of progress in terms of salmon conservation that make up an important part of the history of the Grand Cascapedia River, and Canadian fisheries in general. The river has weathered a variety of managerial missteps, natural calamities, and outside political forces that could have altered it as a viable fishery. This, volume one, chronicles the history of this great salmon river from 1840 to approximately 1935, with photos, maps, and historical documentation that has heretofore remained mostly unexplored.

[Left Quote] The definitive work on the subject... A major contribution to the
sporting life, as well as the economic and social history of Quebec. [Right Quote]

— Charles Wood III, Introduction